• Print
  • Share
 
 

Business Administration Diploma

Description: The Business Administration Diploma prepares you for a wide variety of in-demand career opportunities by developing key business skills and knowledge that employers are looking for. The program curriculum offers various innovative approaches to learning including seminars, expert guest speakers, case analyses, online business simulations, external consulting projects, and experiential excursions.

Time Commitment: This is a two year (4 terms / 60 weeks total) Diploma program. A full course load per semester includes 5 courses. Students may elect to take fewer courses each semester; however it will take longer to complete the program.

Online Option: All common Year One courses are available online, and many courses in Year Two are also available online.


Courses in Program

Program Breakdown: This Diploma program consists of foundation courses to build a practical grounding in general business skills and knowledge. Students choose from nine exciting majors to further develop their business expertise in a business path that is best suited for them. Students must declare their major before applying to graduate. Majors include:

Please review course availability when putting together your schedule. Courses may be taken in any order subject to availability and pre-requisite completion.

Download the program breakdown schedule. 

Semester dates and other important dates: Important Dates

FOUNDATION COURSES

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I (3 credits)*

This course covers fundamental accounting principles and concepts, including the full accounting cycle; accounting for sales and purchases of merchandise; cash control procedure; valuation of receivables and inventories. Other topics include financial statement and worksheet preparation. The course will focus on accounting practices as they apply to small business and sole proprietorship, with an emphasis placed on integrating the basic concepts of accounting.

Available:
In-class: No longer available
Online:  Spring 2017 & Fall 2017 Semesters only (current students only)

Prerequisite(s):
None

Please note: For all new students starting Fall 2017, this course will be replaced with ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting and will generally be available in-class and online for the fall, winter and spring semesters. 

HRES1101 - Organizational Behaviour (3 credits)*

The study of what people think, feel, and do in and around organizations is key to the search for best practice methods and organizational effectiveness. Throughout this course, we will focus on human behavior from an individual, group, and organization perspective while analyzing key elements which influence human behavior and thinking. In addition to the theory component, students will also have an opportunity to develop critical thinking skills through group work, discussion, research, and personal reflection.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:   Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management (3 credits)*

Learners are introduced to concepts, terms, and theories which provide an understanding of the principles of management. Key functions of management, including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, are addressed. The exploration of key functional areas assists learners in developing their own managerial practice. Learners are informed of the vital role a manager plays in an organization.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1201 - Business Communication (3 credits)*

This course covers the theory and practice of effective communication. The course will emphasize class participation through discussion boards, professional conduct, problem-solving and critical thinking as it relates to the communication process. Topics covered will include the importance of psychological factors of communication, clear and concise communication in the workplace, multicultural and nonverbal communication, effective listening and feedback, speaking effectively and efficiently, and the role of conflict management.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1302 - Computer Applications (3 credits)*

This course is a general orientation to pre-packaged software programs and their application to the business environment and to Windows and some of the system utilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1401 - Microeconomics (3 credits)*

Economics is concerned with human behavior and the improvement of society.  The relationship between supply and demand and the scarcity of resources forces consumers to make choices. How do individuals make the best choices to maximize their satisfaction? Microeconomics is about choices and trade-offs, and how firms and individuals interact in markets. How do we make sense of those interactions for our own use in business or as wage earners?

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics (3 credits)*

This course will cover business uses of math and algebra with specific topics including: percentages; ratios, proportions and currency exchange; merchandise mathematics; break-even and cost-volume-profit analysis; simple interest; compound interest including present and future value, annuities, loans and mortgages.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1601 - Business Law (3 credits) [Online Only]*

A basic understanding of key elements of the law is an essential factor in successful business management. Learners apply legal fundamentals useful in today's fast-paced, rapidly changing business environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Only available online
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)*

This course introduces various marketing concepts and practices. Topics include: market research, consumer motivation, buyer behaviour patterns, the industrial market, product planning and development, distribution channels, the price system, personal selling, and advertising.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None


Plus 1 of the following elective courses:

ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II (3 credits)*

Required for students pursuing the Accounting and Financial Services specialization. 

This course covers concepts and principles related to assets, liabilities and equity with a focus on partnerships and corporations. Topics include: accounting for long-term assets including goodwill and intangible assets; current and long-term liabilities; analysis and interpretation of financial statements; partnership and corporation accounting; and cash flow statement preparation and analysis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall 2017 Semester only
Online: Fall 2017 & Winter 2018 Semesters only. 

Please note: For all new students starting Fall 2017, this course will be replaced with ACCT1103 - Introduction to Financial Accounting and will generally be available in-class and online for the fall, winter and spring semesters. 

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

FNSR2101 - Introduction to Insurance (3 credits)

Required for students pursuing the Insurance & Risk Management specialization.

In this course, through the examination of how insurance is used to manage risk, learners explore the laws, concepts and practices commonly encountered in the insurance industry. History and development of insurance worldwide is examined with a focus on Canadian law and practice.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT1102 - Corporate Social Responsibility (3 credits)

If you are thinking of pursuing the Accounting, Financial Services, General Business or Insurance & Risk Management specialization, please refer to the other course options.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) articulates an organization's purpose, values, and concern for society.  This course examines concepts and practical approaches successful companies use to integrate CSR strategies with the needs of business and how they evolve their strategies as business needs change. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Winter Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

Return to Top


MAJORS

Accounting

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Accounting Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following (9 core courses and 1 elective course):

ACCT2301 - Taxation (3 credits) (Prerequisite: ACCT 1102)

This course covers income taxation in Canada, including the theoretical and practical concepts of income tax and the preparation of income tax returns. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and rules of the Canadian Income Tax Act pertaining to the determination of personal income tax payable. Specific topics include the following: employment income, business income, property income, capital gains and losses, other income and deductions, computation of taxable income and taxes payable for individuals.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II

ACCT2101 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I (3 credits)

Building and expanding on accounting knowledge explored during introductory financial accounting, this course takes an in-depth examination of the current accounting principles, practices, and standards for both public and private corporate financial presentation and reporting. The course concepts focus on assets reported in the statement of financial position and the related income effects and results.  Learners apply accounting standards to various business transactions and build professional judgement and decision-making capabilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II  (with a C+ minimum)

ACCT2102 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II (3 credits)

This course continues to examine the complexities of current accounting principles and standards for both public and private corporate financial presentation, with a focus on liabilities and equities. Topics covered include current and long-term liabilities, leases, accounting for income taxes, pensions and other employee benefit plans, complex debt and equity instruments, basic and diluted earnings per share, shareholder’s equity, accounting changes, and analysis of financial statements.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT2101 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

ACCT2201 - Management Accounting I (3 credits)

This course explores the concepts of managerial accounting consisting of the key fundamentals for planning, controlling, and measuring operations. The course topics generally focus on short-term management decision making and the techniques, methods, and systems of performance reporting and evaluation used to assist management in these decisions. Learners explore a variety of costing systems, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting, and variance analysis which are essential to understanding business operations and developing critical thinking and problem-solving capabilities.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II (with a C+ minimum)

ACCT2202 - Management Accounting II (3 credits)

This course delves deeper and expands the examination of the field of managerial accounting. Both short-term and long-term management decision-making are examined and topics include pricing decisions; the balanced score card and product profitability; customer profitability; process costing; spoilage, scrap and rework; cost allocations; joint and by-product costing; inventory planning, control and costing; long-term investment decisions and capital budgeting; transfer pricing and other control systems and performance measurements used in reporting for control.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT2201 - Management Accounting I

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

The focus of finance is on the increasing value of the firm as measured by the market value of the share price. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Semesters
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2501 - Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)

This course covers the basic techniques and tools of statistical analysis and interpretation. Emphasis is placed on examples that occur in, or relate to, the business environment. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and methods of time series analysis.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)

This capstone course will provide students with an introduction to strategic management. The course delivery will also include an internet-based business simulation. Topics covered will include: company missions, external environment, internal analysis, strategic analysis, and implementation.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
FNSR2201 - Business Finance


Plus 1 of the following electives:

MGMT2301 - Microsoft Excel (3 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive presentation of Microsoft Excel. The course will begin with a review of the basic Excel topics presented in MGMT 1302 before new topics are introduced. New topics include: charting, formatting worksheets, absolute cell references, working with large worksheets, what-if analysis, worksheet database manipulation, lookup functions, database functions, templates, and working with multiple worksheets and workbooks.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):

MGMT1302 - Computer Applications

MGMT2302 - Computerized Accounting for Management (3 credits)*

This course is a “hands-on” approach to performing accounting functions with pre-packaged software. Topics includes the set-up and on-going maintenance of the general ledger, accounts receivable, and accounts payable.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Fall Semesters
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

Return to Top


Event Management

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.

In order to complete the Event Management Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MKTG2201 - Customer Service Management (3 credits)

This course encompasses the essential principles of customer service with additional focus on effective communication, problem solving and complaint handling skills. Offering exceptional customer service, at any level in an organization, is the key factor to whether an employee or a business survives, thrives and stands apart from the competitors. Customer Service Management will provide a comprehensive assessment of best practices for the successful management of the giving and receiving of the client experience.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2103 - PR & Digital Media (3 credits)

Now a days, information can be spread faster and further than ever before in history. Digital PR is all about combining traditional PR with compelling content, social media and search optimization to spread the word. In this class you will learn how to establish mutually beneficial relationships with stakeholders digitally. Instruction is provided on the ongoing history of new media and the impact they are having on society and the public relations profession. Students are introduced to the basics of a variety of digital media vehicles used to share news and create dialogue.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2201 - Introduction to Fundraising (3 credits)

Many organizations, either charitable or not-for-profit look to raise money every year to fulfill their mission. This course offers an insight into special events from the charitable perspective and provides an understanding of how fundraising and the processes involved can work in any community campaign. Instruction will cover basic fund-raising concepts including skills and techniques that ensure the self-sufficiency and long-term growth of a non-profit or a charitable organization. Learners will understand the requirements of making an event successful in the non-profit sector. Finally, learners will build knowledge in fund development strategies and activities within the context of special events. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2204 - Building & Maintaining Stakeholder Relations (3 credits)

Stakeholders have an enormous impact on an organization’s mission and objectives. Therefore, it is important to learn who your stakeholders are and know how to build and maintain mutually beneficial relations. This course includes examination of strategies and tactics on how a public relations professional develops a communications plan to build, manage and sustain relations with stakeholders, including the media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism (3 credits)

This course defines the tourism industry and how all industry groups work together to meet the needs and expectations of the visitor. The course will focus on the impact and contributions to the economy by the tourism industry.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occurs in order to create and produce well organized and well managed events. It involves the effective procurement, organization and implementation of all the products, services and service providers that will bring an event to life. As a professional event planner, you must have an understanding of the role and scope of event management as it is practiced in a broad variety of event contexts. Whether you are creating and coordinating celebrations, conferences, fundraisers, expositions, corporate hospitality events, award galas, fashion shows, mitzvahs, grand opening, familiarization tours or incentive trips, you must be familiar with the tasks required to perform the complex responsibilities associated with their design, planning and production. This course will examine techniques and procedures required for producing successful and sustainable events of all types and sizes.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2202 - Meetings, Expositions & Conventions (3 credits)

For as long as there have been people, there have been meetings and despite rising costs for transportation and hospitality services, more and more meetings are being held in today's fast-paced environment. Meetings, Exhibitions and Conventions introduces you to the scope, diversity and changing aspects of this growing and profitable sector within the tourism industry. Examining the major players and components that make up a convention and/or exhibition, students will gain insights into the workings of this sector. Instruction is provided on processes and techniques for producing successful event gatherings including planning and design elements of meetings, exhibitions and conventions. Finally, students explore new technologies that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of critical elements included in the meeting planner's responsibilities. 

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2203 - Creating the Event Experience (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occurs in order to create and produce well-organized and well-managed events. The event professional must look at an event as an entire production, similar to a theatrical production, focusing on what the attendee will see and hear during the event. We will look at determining what it is the client wants and needs to achieve, in order to select the most appropriate décor, the right effects and specific equipment for the job based on the resources available. In this course we will concentrate on working with the necessary suppliers to create an environment with a purpose, the desired message and a legacy of memories. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management

TOUR2204 - Catered Events (3 credits)

Whether your event is on a mountain top, at the beach, in a garden, or a corporate hotel, as a skilled event planner you have to be competent at developing the right menu and catering services to make your client's event a success. Catered Events focuses on the fundamentals of the business and the craft of catering for events. You will be introduced to the catering contract and examines various negotiation techniques. You will also explore menu-planning, styles of service, room setups and staff requirements for different types of functions. Instruction is provided on creating menus to match clients' budgets and on how to plan a deep-market themed event. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Financial Services

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Financial Services Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

ACCT2301 - Taxation (3 credits)

This course covers income taxation in Canada, including the theoretical and practical concepts of income tax and the preparation of income tax returns. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and rules of the Canadian Income Tax Act pertaining to the determination of personal income tax payable. Specific topics include the following: employment income, business income, property income, capital gains and losses, other income and deductions, computation of taxable income and taxes payable for individuals.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT1102 - Financial Accounting Principles II

FNSR2101 - Introduction to Insurance (3 credits)

In this course, through the examination of how insurance is used to manage risk, learners explore the laws, concepts and practices commonly encountered in the insurance industry. History and development of insurance worldwide is examined with a focus on Canadian law and practice.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

Finance focuses on the increasing value of a firm. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

FNSR2301 - Financial Markets & Products (3 credits)

This course introduces concept of money, the Canadian financial system, personal and commercial banking products and credit granting criteria. The Credit Rating/Scoring system, CDIC coverage, and banking transactions will also be examined.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2302 - Personal Financial Planning (3 credits)

This course explores and applies the eight components of a financial plan into comprehensive case studies. Money management, banking, credit, insurance, tax analysis, investment planning, retirement planning and estate planning are covered. Time value of money, regulation of the financial planning industry and dealing with diverse clientele will also be examined. A comprehensive financial case study completes the course. 

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2303 - Investment Funds in Canada (3 credits)

This is the Canadian Securities Institute mutual fund course allowing successful learners to be licensed and to sell mutual funds.  The course covers all aspects of the Financial and Mutual Fund industry, mutual fund and investment products and the regulatory system governing the mutual fund industry and acceptable selling practices and processes.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2501 - Financial Selling & Ethics (3 credits)

This course introduces participants to a proven relationship sales model with an emphasis on selling in the financial services industry.  Sales presentation skills, ethics and selling, and cultural diversity will also be covered.  Role-playing, in-class presentations and in-class exercises will integrate these skills into an interactive learning experience.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2201 - Customer Service Management (3 credits)

This course encompasses the essential principles of customer service with additional focus on effective communication, problem solving and complaint handling skills. Offering exceptional customer service, at any level in an organization, is the key factor to whether an employee or a business survives, thrives and stands apart from the competitors. Customer Service Management will provide a comprehensive assessment of best practices for the successful management of the giving and receiving of the client experience.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)

This capstone course will provide students with an introduction to strategic management. The course delivery will also include an internet-based business simulation. Topics covered will include: company missions, external environment, internal analysis, strategic analysis, and implementation.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
FNSR2201 - Business Finance

Return to Top


General Business

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

The General Business major is designed to provide students with seamless pathways to further post-secondary studies at various universities in Alberta. Please consult with a Student Engagement Officer if you are planning to transfer to one of Bow Valley College's many post-secondary partners.

In order to complete the General Business Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 elective courses from the following:

General Business Major Elective Courses


Plus 1 of the following courses:

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)

This capstone course will provide students with an introduction to strategic management. The course delivery will also include an internet-based business simulation. Topics covered will include: company missions, external environment, internal analysis, strategic analysis, and implementation.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
FNSR2201 - Business Finance

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Math

Return to Top


Global Tourism

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Global Tourism Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study for effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include: social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling & Ethics (3 credits)

This course introduces participants to a proven relationship sales model with an emphasis on selling in the tourism services industry.  Sales presentation skills, ethics and selling, and cultural diversity will also be covered.  Role-playing, in-class presentations and in-class exercises will integrate these skills into an interactive learning experience.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism (3 credits)

This course defines the tourism industry and how all industry groups work together to meet the needs and expectations of the visitor. The course will focus on the impact and contributions to the economy by the tourism industry.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):

None

TOUR2102 - Human & Regional Geography (3 credits)

This course focuses on the connections and continuous interplay between features of place, populations, resources, cultures, and political systems. Human activities, natural processes, and their interaction with landscapes will also be covered.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2103 - Global Product Development (3 credits)

This course will cover effective processes for generating product ideas and examining general demand factors and trends, travel motivation and market segmentation. Destination development and emerging non-traditional destinations will also be examined.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2104 - Sustainable Tourism Management (3 credits)

The rapid growth of tourism on a global scale has resulted in significant negative environmental impacts, and there is increasing concern about the relationship between tourism and the environment, both natural and cultural. This course will explore the challenges facing the tourism industry in attempting to create a balance between environmental and economic concerns. The importance of "greening" of the industry will be examined.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2202 - Meetings, Expositions & Conventions (3 credits)

For as long as there have been people, there have been meetings and today despite rising costs for transportation and hospitality services more and more meetings are being held. Meetings, Expositions and Conventions introduces you to the scopes, diversity and changing aspects of this sector of the tourism industry which continues to grow and be a profitable market segment. We examine the major players and components that make up a convention and/or exposition to gain insights into the workings of this sector. We learn about processes and techniques for producing successful event gatherings and plan and design elements of meetings, expositions and conventions. Finally, we explore new technologies that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of critical elements of the meeting planner’s work.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2999 - Advanced Global Tourism (3 credits)

This project-based course will provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate all skills and abilities utilizing knowledge gained in introduction to global tourism, human and regional geography, international business, global product development, sustainable tourism, management, marketing, and college-wide learning outcomes through an individual project. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
TOUR2101 - Introduction to Global Tourism

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Human Resources

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Human Resources Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources (3 credits)*

This course focusses on the importance of aligning human resource practices with organizational strategies and employment legislative acts. Through an exploration of workforce planning, recruitment, selection, orientation, learning and development, performance management, total rewards and recognition, learners reflect on the process of recruiting and retaining employees to achieve an engaged workforce. Trend analysis includes discussion on workplace health and safety.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2202 - Recruitment & Selection (3 credits)*

This course examines how to create and sustain an effective recruitment and selection program. The framework focusses on the alignment of the organizational strategy with the recruitment and selection processes. Learners formulate plans based on a  workforce plan and apply the five steps to various business scenarios. Learners assess evaluation techniques and performance management as methods of employee retention. Trend analysis includes changes to recruitment and selection with social media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources

HRES2203 - Compensation & Benefits (3 credits)*

This course focusses on the total rewards package that includes compensation, benefits, and monetary or non-monetary rewards. The importance of aligning the organizational strategy with the total rewards package forms the foundation for this human resource functional area. Alberta legislative acts are researched. Practical experience with the process of job evaluation and connecting performance standards to the compensation plan are explained. Trends in compensation are researched. 

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
HRES2201 - Introduction to Human Resources

HRES2301 - Employment Law (3 credits)*

This course examines the legal rights, responsibilities and obligations of employers and employees within the workplace. A framework of employment law is reviewed throughout the recruiting, hiring, performance managing, promoting and the terminating of employees. Laws pertaining to Human Rights, Employment Standards, Workers' Compensation, Equity in the Workplace and Privacy are researched, as human resource professionals must learn to assess risks and to evaluate options that reduce potential liability. Trends are analyzed about social media in the workplace.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2302 - Labour Relations (3 credits)

Labour Relations examines the history of industrial relations and unions within Canada as well as analyzes union management roles and relationships within the Alberta workplace. The role of human resources within a union environment is explored and the relationship with key stakeholders (unions, employees, employers, and governments) are outlined. The collective bargaining process which includes the negotiation of articles within a collective agreement is assessed. Trend analysis includes changes that have been made to the negotiation process.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

HRES2303 - Occupational Health & Safety (3 credits)*

This course examines legislative acts, builds engagement within the workforce on importance of health and safety as well as identifies hazards that exist in the workplace. Creation and evaluation of training programs are presented to  increase the importance of health and safety in the workplace. Wellness, disability management and return to work programs are reviewed. Focus is on the trends that are emerging in the workplace, which include bullying. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester
Online: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: New - starting Spring 2017!   Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study for effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organizations normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first of all prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen actual damage, and protect the organizations reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Insurance & Risk Management

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Insurance & Risk Management Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and 10 courses from the following (7 core courses and 3 elective courses):

Note: This program has been revised. For students who started prior to September 2015, please follow the former program course list attached. 

FNSR2201 - Business Finance (3 credits)*

Finance focuses on the increasing value of a firm. This course examines the major decisions faced by the financial manager. Specific topics include functions and goals of financial management, financial analysis, working capital management, time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, bond and equity valuation, long-term debt and equity financing, and dividend policy.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Semesters
Online:  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I

FNSR2401 - Risk Management Principles & Practice (3 credits)

This course provides students with a broad understanding of risk management and the risk management process.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation students must achieve 70% on a two hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional $125 fee for each exam.

FNSR2104 - Automobile Insurance (3 credits)

This course is a study of Canadian automobile insurance, its legislation, policies, and regulations. With an overview of different provincial approaches to automobile insurance, learners examine in detail owner's policies and coverages specific to Alberta and focus on personal coverages. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2103 - Insurance Against Liability (3 credits)

To understand liability insurance, learners must understand the law and the Canadian legal system as well as the differences between the common law and the Civil Code of Quebec. Learners are introduced to legal principles that affect liability insurance. Insurance against liability examines some of the more common ways people become liable and explains how this liability may or may not be insured. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2102 - Insurance on Property (3 credits)

This course is the foundation for all types of property insurance. Explanations of the principles, doctrines, and characteristics are included. The course demonstrates the legislative framework reflected in common commercial and personal lines insurance policies. Learners explore how legislation develops in response to new and changing practical problems.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2402 - Risk Assessment & Treatment (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to develop an enterprise-wide perspective of risk by applying risk management concepts to four major categories: hazard (insurable), operational, financial, and strategic. This course broadens your understanding of risk management from its traditional focus on accidental losses to include all risks an organization may face. Learn about global risk management standards such as ISO 31000 and the COSO ERM – Integrated Framework, and discuss various risk identification and analysis techniques in detail. Apply rudimentary analytical tools to assess financial risk in areas of financial leverage, liquidity risk, and capital investment risk. Risk oversight, monitoring, and assurance are discussed from the perspective of governance and internal control. This course relies heavily on insurance based content consistent with risk assessment and risk management principles.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation students must achieve 70% on a two hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional $125 fee for each exam.

MGMT2998 - Business Strategy (3 credits)

This capstone course will provide students with an introduction to strategic management. The course delivery will also include an internet-based business simulation. Topics covered will include: company missions, external environment, internal analysis, strategic analysis, and implementation.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
FNSR2201 - Business Finance


Plus 3 electives from the following:

FNSR2105 - Essentials of Loss Adjusting (3 credits)

In the context of automobile, property, and liability claims, this course focuses on interpersonal skills and knowledge to help learners develop claims-handling techniques. The process of policy analysis for coverage evaluation including investigation, negotiation, and settlement is explored. Learners reflect on managing relationships to gather critical information.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2106 - Underwriting Essentials (3 credits)

Taking the role of an underwriter, learners analyze individual property, liability, and automobile risks. The course begins with an overview of the underwriter's role as an investor of shareholder capital on behalf of the insurer. Learners examine how the underwriter role has evolved. The course covers an underwriter as a risk assessor and explores the technical and interpersonal skills needed to succeed.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2107 - Essential Skills for Brokers & Agent (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of insurance business practices from the broker's perspective with a focus on the needs of personal lines clients and small commercial risks.  The learner, as an insurance intermediary, is given insight into the skills needed to perform effectively.  Following the process of risk from evaluation through to documentation, learners review the major product lines and common policy transactions a broker executes.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2403 - Risk Financing (3 credits)

This course will assess the methods which an organization can obtain funds to pay for accidental losses. Emphasis is placed on the selection, implementation and monitoring of various risk financing techniques. Specific subjects discussed are: a framework for risk financing; criteria for risk financing selection techniques; insurance as a mechanism for financing property, net income, personnel, and liability losses; accounting and income tax aspects of accidental losses; insurance pricing; selection of insurers and their representatives; implementing risk retention available options, including the use of affiliated insurers; and cost of risk allocation techniques.

Generally available:
In-class:  Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

In order for this course to count towards the Canadian Risk Management (CRM) Designation students must achieve 70% on a two hour CRM standardized examination and pay an additional $125 fee for each exam.

MGMT2102 - Project Management (3 credits)[Online only]*

This course introduces the basic elements of project management. You will learn the characteristics of projects, the principles of project managements and the five stages involved in effectively managing projects. By the end of this course, you will have been able to create a Needs Analysis document, a Project Proposal, and a Project- Management Plan. You will be able to create a Gantt Chart to plot the timelines of a project.

Generally available:
Online: starting Fall 2017 Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2301 - Microsoft Excel (3 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive presentation of Microsoft Excel. The course will begin with a review of the basic Excel topics presented in MGMT 1302 before new topics are introduced. New topics include: charting, formatting worksheets, absolute cell references, working with large worksheets, what-if analysis, worksheet database manipulation, lookup functions, database functions, templates, and working with multiple worksheets and workbooks.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1302 - Computer Applications

MGMT 2401 - Macroeconomics (3 credits)

This course will provide learners with the tools necessary to retrieve and analyze macroeconomic information for evidence-based decision-making. Learners will explore personal and business contextual knowledge on how to critically evaluate day-to-day topics such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Consumer Price Index (CPI), interest rates, government budget, exchange rates, and fiscal and monetary policy.

Gnerally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: New- starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2501 - Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)

This course covers the basic techniques and tools of statistical analysis and interpretation. Emphasis is placed on examples that occur in, or relate to, the business environment. Topics include collection and presentation of data, measures of descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, correlation and regression analysis, and methods of time series analysis. 

Generally available:
In-class: Fall & Spring Semesters
Online: New- starting Spring 2017!  Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1501 - Business Math

Return to Top


Marketing

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Marketing Major, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MKTG2101 - Consumer Behaviour (3 credits)

This course is an advanced marketing course designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the fundamentals of consumer behaviour, with emphasis on the consumer in the marketplace, consumers as individuals, consumers as decision makers, and consumers as influenced by culture and subculture. An examination of consumer behaviour theories and research will be a key component of this course. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the application of consumer behaviour concepts in a competitive, dynamic, and global business environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include: social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2201 - Customer Service Management (3 credits)

This course encompasses the essential principles of customer service with additional focus on effective communication, problem solving and complaint handling skills. Offering exceptional customer service, at any level in an organization, is the key factor to whether an employee or a business survives, thrives and stands apart from the competitors. Customer Service Management will provide a comprehensive assessment of best practices for the successful management of the client experience.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling & Ethics (3 credits)

This course will introduce the concept of relationship sales model with an emphasis on ethical practices. Sales presentation skills and cultural diversity will be covered in an interactive learning environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2101 - Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)

This course is an overview of the public relations profession: what it is, how it is practiced and what you do as a PR practitioner. By studying the history and the purpose of PR in society students will learn that the profession has its own distinct body of theory, ethics, and professionalism. Fundamental strategic communications are learnt through examining the RACE Formula and learning how to prepare a communications plan.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organizations normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first of all prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen actual damage, and protect the organizations reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2201 - Introduction to Fundraising (3 credits)

Many organizations, either charitable or not-for-profit look to raise money every year to fulfill their mission. This course offers an insight into special events from the charitable perspective and provides an understanding of how fundraising and the processes involved can work in any community campaign. Instruction will cover basic fund-raising concepts including skills and techniques that ensure the self-sufficiency and long-term growth of a non-profit or a charitable organization. Learners will understand the requirements of making an event successful in the non-profit sector. Finally, learners will build knowledge in fund development strategies and activities within the context of special events. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2202 - Communication Research & Planning (3 credits)

Research, research, research. This is one of the most critical components of planning and evaluation for public relations professional. In this course, students will learn why research is recommended for public relations, when it is required, what information is needed and how data is collected. Various research topics will be examined such as: qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, and formal and information research methods. Students will learn how to distinguish and recognize various PR research instruments and metrics, including: media monitoring, communications audits, focus groups, interviewing, opinion polls and surveys to plan and evaluate various public relations campaigns including social media campaigns. Students get an opportunity to conduct their own research in order to build a Communications plan following the RACE formula.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

TOUR2201 - Introduction to Event Management (3 credits)

Event Management is the process through which all planning and development occurs in order to create and produce well organized and well managed events. It involves the effective procurement, organization and implementation of all the products, services and service providers that will bring an event to life. As a professional event planner, you must have an understanding of the role and scope of event management as it is practiced in a broad variety of event contexts. Whether you are creating and coordinating celebrations, conferences, fundraisers, expositions, corporate hospitality events, award galas, fashion shows, mitzvahs, grand openings, familiarization tours or incentive trips, you must be familiar with the tasks required to perform the complex responsibilities associated with their design, planning and production. This course will examine techniques and procedures required for producing successful and sustainable events of all types and sizes.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Public Relations

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

In order to complete the Public Relations Specialization, you must receive credit for all the Foundation Courses and the following 10 courses:

MGMT2801 - International Business (3 credits)

This course will present a study for effective processes for understanding country differentiation and examine strategies and structure of international business. Students will engage in a cross-cultural approach by comparing national marketing systems and local commercial customs.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MKTG2102 - Global Marketing (3 credits)

This advanced course focuses on the marketing to a global audience. Topics will include: social networking, social media, viral marketing, and the international consumer.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing

MKTG2202 - Professional Selling & Ethics (3 credits)

This course will introduce the concept of relationship sales model with an emphasis on ethical practices. Sales presentation skills and cultural diversity will be covered in an interactive learning environment.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2101 - Introduction to Public Relations (3 credits)

This course is an overview of the public relations profession: what it is, how it is practiced and what you do as a PR practitioner. By studying the history and the purpose of PR in society students will learn that the profession has its own distinct body of theory, ethics, and professionalism. Fundamental strategic communications are learnt through examining the RACE Formula and learning how to prepare a communications plan.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2102 - Crisis Communications & Reputation Management (3 credits)

A crisis can disrupt any organizations normal operations, put its reputation in danger and damage its bottom line. This course will teach you how to identify a true crisis versus an issue. Topics covered include how to write a crisis communications plan with strategies and tactics to first of all prevent issues and crises, and when necessary withstand a crisis, lessen actual damage, and protect the organizations reputation.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2103 - PR & Digital Media (3 credits)

Now a days, information can be spread faster and further than ever before in history. Digital PR is all about combining traditional PR with compelling content, social media and search optimization to spread the word. In this class you will learn how to establish mutually beneficial relationships with stakeholders digitally. Instruction is provided on the ongoing history of new media and the impact they are having on society and the public relations profession. Students are introduced to the basics of a variety of digital media vehicles used to share news and create dialogue.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2104 - Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)

In PR you need more than people skills to succeed - you need to be able to write and develop various types of PR collateral such as: blogs, web copy, social media posts, news releases, op-eds, articles, speeches and more. Writing effectively, the delivery and the timing of the message to the target audience can be the key to successful communication for any organization. This course covers the various forms of public relations writing and their application whether trying to persuade or inform the media, the public, employees or shareholders. Students learn how to write clearly, concisely, and persuasively while working under tight deadlines and editing their work and the work of others.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1201 Business Communication (with a B+ minimum)

PREL2202 - Communication Research & Planning (3 credits)

Research, research, research. This is one of the most critical components of planning and evaluation for public relations professional. In this course, students will learn why research is recommended for public relations, when it is required, what information is needed and how data is collected. Various research topics will be examined such as: qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, and formal and information research methods. Students will learn how to distinguish and recognize various PR research instruments and metrics, including: media monitoring, communications audits, focus groups, interviewing, opinion polls and surveys to plan and evaluate various public relations campaigns including social media campaigns. Students get an opportunity to conduct their own research in order to build a Communications plan following the RACE formula.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

PREL2204 - Building & Maintaining Stakeholder Relations (3 credits)

Stakeholders have an enormous impact on an organization’s mission and objectives. Therefore, it is important to learn who your stakeholders are and know how to build and maintain mutually beneficial relations. This course includes examination of strategies and tactics on how a public relations professional develops a communications plan to build, manage and sustain relations with stakeholders, including the media.

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2999 - Business Integration (3 credits)

This capstone course integrates material from previous courses in the Business Administration Diploma program. This course will cover the application of the following concepts: production, marketing, R&D, HR, financial operations, and how key decisions impact business performance within a competitive market.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters

Prerequisite(s):
MGMT1101 - Introduction to Management
MKTG1101 - Introduction to Marketing
ACCT1101 - Financial Accounting Principles I
MGMT1501 - Business Mathematics

Return to Top


Open Elective Courses 

Click on the blue box to view the course description and any prerequisite courses.
* Indicates course that is also available online

MGMT2102 - Project Management (3 credits)[Online only]*

This course introduces the basic elements of project management. You will learn the characteristics of projects, the principles of project management and the five stages involved in effectively managing projects. By the end of this course, you will have been able to create a Needs Analysis document, a Project Proposal, a Project Management Plan, and a Gantt Chart to plot the timelines of a project.

Generally available:
Online: starting Fall 2017 Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

MGMT2901 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3 credits)

This course explores the field of entrepreneurship and the small business environment  in Canada. Students will get the opportunity to explore pursuing a career or passion within this discipline. Examine businesses in a holistic manner to determine profit and success potential as both a proprietor and investor. 

Generally available:
In-class: Winter Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

FNSR2202 - Fundamentals of Financial Management (3 credits)*

This course provides learners with an overview of how non-financial managers use financial information in planning, organizing, evaluating, and decision-making. Key topics include understanding financial information, analyzing financial statements and reports, the role of the finance and accounting department, and how financial information impacts organizational governance.

Generally available:
In-class: Fall, Winter & Spring Semesters
Online: Fall Semester

Prerequisite(s):
None

Return to Top

Co-operative Education Option

Co-op Education combines academic studies with work-related experience for Business Administration Diploma students in good academic standing. Through an active job search, co-op students bridge their classroom studies with practical, paid experience in their field of study for an entire term (fall, winter, or summer). Acceptance into this non-credit co-op program is competitive and students must complete the application process to be considered. Not all students will be offered a co-op placement. Find more information on the Co-op Option here

Get started. Click on Apply Now